Wednesday, 25 July 2012

Citadel of Chaos playthrough

 Written by  Steve Jackson, Artwork by Russ Nicholson

There's so much to say about this book, I feel that I want to give it a bit of an introduction first.

Citadel of Chaos was the second FF book, and in terms of structure and formula it's very similar to Warlock of Firetop Mountain. Where it differs is in terms of location - rather than a dungeon, we're given a castle. As a result, the rooms we encounter feel more cohesive, as if they're a functional part of a greater castle, as opposed to the isolated rooms of Firetop. We can see elements of Citadel crop up many times in FF books whenever you're exploring a large castle or temple.

The storyline is equally simple. Balthus Dire is planning to conquor a friendly, happy region and you've been asked to slip into the castle and 'take care' of Dire before the invasion can go ahead. Hope you like pre-emptive assassination missions! Dire, if you remember, was one of the three iconic evil wizards in FF books, along with Zagor and Marr. While Zagor appeared in three books, and Marr's history and personality were powerful factors in Creature of Havoc, this is the only time we see Dire. Frankly, he's kinda the 'little brother' of the three, and I do think he's the one character I'd love to see more done with. If I were to write my own adventure gamebook (and I am playing with the idea of doing so), I'd imagine Dire would be an important character.

In terms of how the game works, there's some changes to Firetop. For a start, meals are gone. You don't start with any. Your only way to regain stamina is via magic. Yeah, magic - in this adventure, you're an apprentice wizard. It's the first time that FF tries to give the player spells to use, which is a system that FF revisits often, with mixed success. Remember that at this point in the series, there was no 'Fighting Fantasy formula', so experiments like this are so very cool to see.

It's also worth noting that thus far, this book has probably seen the most number of different covers. The original artwork is my fave, with a conga-line of monsters pacing out of the titular citadel, with a beastie I've come to call 'Big Wooly' at the front giving the audience a toothy grin. The second cover, which is the one I grew up with, features a big green tornado-type entity. And although the wizard publish copy has a third one, my copy is the Big Wooly one. I love this one the best.

Let's par-tay down!
My wizard is the weakest wizard in the land. He has a puny skill of 7 and a stamina of 14. I think the dice gods are mocking me. Guessing that I'm going to take a lot of damage, I take four Stamina spells (to heal my sorry ass), three Shield spells, one Strength spell, I also take two ESP spells in case I require the extra clues. And working from my memory of playing this game as a kid, I stock up on four Levitation spells, which I remember being very important in this particular adventure. I try to think of a name for my character. 'Rincewind' is too obvious. I choose a far more insulting name, a name perfectly fitting for someone who has no skill, no genuine mystic abilities, and who will contribute nothing of value to this escapade. I call him James Van Praagh.

Like anyone on a top-secret assassination mission going into an enemy castle to kill the lord, I decide to sneak into the castle under cover of moonlight, scaling one of the rear walls and... nah, just kidding, I walk right up to the main door and ask the guards to let me in!

The guards here are awesome. One is an ape-dog, and the other is a dog-ape. I'm not sure which is which, but they're clearly the result of one of Dire's mad experiments in head-swapping. I must confess that if I were a mad wizard, I'd want a puppy with a gorilla's head to guard my castle. I'd call him Pip.

The book gives me the chance of telling Pip that I'm a tradesman - this is kinda true, as assassination is a trade. "Hi, mind if I come in and brutally slaughter your master and all his servants?" It seems that Pip doesn't take too kindly to that suggestion, as both guards attack. Given that James Van Praagh is the weakest and most inept being in the known world, he barely survives this combat. I suspect this will be a short adventure, folks!

The next section is pure comedy gold. I call for the guardsman, who comes running. He opens the door to the castle, while I hide in the shadows. I'm not sure what shadows, but... yeah, just 'the shadows'. Anyway, the guardsman opens the door and sees the dead Ape-Dog and Dog-Ape, and rather than drawing his sword or raising a call for alarm, he instead stands still just long enough for me to knock him out as well.

I can only assume that I then drag all three bodies into 'the shadows', because leaving the in one big pile at the front of the castle seems a bit silly. Of course, I could just drag every dead body back here and leave them in one huge pile, just for fun. People could travel from across Titan to see the pile of dead bodies, it could be a tourist attraction. Although now that I think about it, this seems to be the kind of perfect tourist idea for people taking their holidays in Game of Thrones. "Come to Westeros, see the biggest pile of dead bodies in the world!"

Keeping with my intention of actually sneaking into the castle, I slip along the inner wall of the courtyard until I come to a wounded man. He is badly hurt, and will probably die unless I cast one of my precious Stamina spells on him. There's no guarantee that he won't attack me afterwards though. But eh, who wants to live forever (with the exception of Connor McLeod)? I cast a Stamina spell on him.

My pile of dead bodies is bigger than yours!
He thanks me, and tells me that he has been attacked by Ganjees, which I'm assuming is a type of goblin and not a river in India. Although given how heavily polluted the river is meant to be, I wouldn't be surprised either way. To thank me for my kindness, he gives me a magic shield that will boost my skill up to a decent level... no, I'm kidding. He bites me.

Yeah, I should have just left him in bleeding in the ground. The man staggers around, possessed like something out of one of the overlooked prequel movies to The Exorcist. My stamina is low at this point, so I choose to throw a spell at him in order to avoid combat. From the list it gives me, the only one I have is 'Shield'. So I throw a magic barrier between us and... the book tells me 'Your spell had no effect'.

It doesn't tell me WHY it had no effect. It just didn't work.

So, the man bites me again, and I whack him out with the flat of my sword. I spend one of my few remaining Stamina spells to get back some of that health, and promptly drag the man's dead body to the front of the main gates to be left in the pile there.

I continue to sneak along the inner wall of the courtyard, when the book asks me to test my luck to avoid falling into a giant pit. Okay, pause for a moment. What is a giant pit doing in the middle of a courtyard? Wouldn't a good number of Dire's minions end up falling into it? I just can't imagine any reason that this pit would be here. Is it a crack in the foundation of the citadel that's just grown to ridiculous degree? Surely Dire could just contract some builders to come in and fix it!

Imagine, if you will, one of Balthus Dire's lieutenants knocking on his door at the end of each day, handing him a report of how many of his troops he'd lost that day simply from them falling down a hole! Is this Dire's idea of a massive joke to play on his troops? Is he just trolling them? If it were a latrine or something, I'd understand it. But it's not, it's just a giant pit that happens to have opened up in the middle of the courtyard of his citadel!

Right, enough about the hole. I eventually get to the doorway into the citadel's main building, picking some berries off a nearby shrub as I do. The door itself is heavy, and I'm given two options. I can either knock on the door to call the guard to open it, or I can cast my only Strength spell and use that to work my way through it. Naturally, I don't want to attract too much attention, so I spend my Strength spell. I take a few steps back, charge at the door... and take a stamina point of damage as I collide with it. The door doesn't budge. Once again, James Van Praagh demonstrates just how inept and useless he is.


Balthus Dire's new guard
The door is opened by a bipedal rhinoceros in plate armour. Rather than trying to impale me on its horn right away, it asks me for the password. I don't have one, so I instead take a test of luck and try to convince him that I'm a travelling herbalist who was summoned by Dire. Amazingly, the guard believes me and lets me pass. I am now inside... the Citadel of Chaos!!

I head down the narrow hallway until I see some stairs leading down towards a door. I want to open this door, but it is locked. The book then gives me two options - to cast a Strength spell (I have none left), or to try to break down the door. I don't want to do either, fearing that my attempt to break down the door will leave me transformed into a reddish smear on the wood, but I'm not given any other options to take, I need to try to break the door down. Amazingly, it breaks. Rawr, hulk smash.

I step into the room. It is completely barren except for a table. Floating above the table is a sleeping leprechaun. Oh great, it's going to be one of THOSE type of rooms. The moment I step in, I hear a catapult launching something at me, and I have to spend one of my remaining Shield spells in order to avoid being hit by the trap. Upon closer inspection, the object launched at me was not an arrow or a vial of acid or anything, but a simple tomato. I've wasted a Shield spell on avoiding being pelted with a tomato. I get the feeling that the book is now trying to actively make fun of me.

The Leprechaun now wakes up, introduces himself as O'Seamus, and offers to shake my hand. I'm given two options - I can either shake his hand, or chop his head off. I'm not given a logical third option, which would be to run away from the scary little bastard. So, hoping he won't kill me outright with his evil Irish magics, I shake his hand. Mercifully, he only zaps me with Skill-draining lightning, glues my hand to a doll, and tells me a riddle. Did I ever tell you that I hate leprechauns, pixies and sprites?

I don't even bother trying to solve his riddle, because even if I did, I don't trust that the little bastard wouldn't give me the wrong answer anyway just to torment me. There are several doors out of the room, and I pick the one with a bronze handle. As I step through it, I am blinded by a huge flash of light and some snarling monster attacks me. Having already cast my Strength spell, there's nothing I can do while the monster attacks me, clawing at my leg, eventually closing its teeth around my throat... I then wake up, only to realise that the entire monster attack was simply an illusion created by O'Seamus!

The book tells me that I feel the funny side of the joke, and start to laugh. No. No, I do not. I do not see the funny side to the joke, and any laughter is simply a side-effect of my urge to crush the leprechaun's head beneath my boot. Nevertheless, for being 'such a good sport', he gives me a magic sword and a silver mirror. I leave, through the same door I intended to leave through, and if I ever see O'Seamus again I swear I'll chop his nuts off.

The path leads down into the bowels of the citadel, into the caves beneath it. At the bank of an underground river (y'know, if that pit from earlier HAD been a latrine, it could have emptied downstream of here, making it all a bit more sensible) I see something quite curious. An old woman is washing clothes by the bank of the river, and my ESP tells me that she is the ghost of a woman. It seems that, in life, she was asked by Balthus Dire to finish his laundry, but she was late in doing so. As punishment, he burned her and her children to death, and cursed her spirit to forever wash clothes in a river under his citadel....

Y'know, a few weeks ago, the woman at my local laundrette wouldn't refund me when the conditioner dispenser ate my money. I imagine that if Balthus Dire was in my place, he'd have eradicated the entire city with lava beasts or something. I mean, seriously, over-reacting much? "You have wronged me for the last time, washer woman!"

Anyway, I try to sneak past this vengeful spirit, but she is filled with rage and lashes out, animating the clothing that she is washing. The clothes whip and snap at me, like jocks do to geeks in school gym class. To appease her, I give the spirit the silver mirror. I can't imagine why she wants a silver mirror, but she seems content enough to leave me alone.

I press on through the caves, and eventually come to a door. Slipping through, I see a large stone table, and three treasure chests piled in the corner. The room also contains a large stone golem. Yeesh. I wanted what was in those chests. I wanted them badly. I don't know what it was, but I had the strongest suspicion that it'd be very important. That'd be why they were guarded by a stone golem.

And so in order to get those chests, I had to fight the golem. I charged up to full stamina with my spell, and drew my sword. During the fight, both myself and the golem traded blows pretty much equally. As the last round of combat came up, both myself and the golem were on 2 stamina points. That's about as close as it can ever come. Sadly, the golem rolled highest, and swatted me down like a bug. Thus ended my adventures in the Citadel of Chaos. And want to know the funny bit? I didn't use one levitation spell.

Citadel is a pretty fun book, the environment is a huge step up from Firetop Mountain. It's still very simplistic, but not in a dumbed-down way, because the implementation of magic spells adds a whole new level to the book. It works very nicely, and gives an additional challenge as you try to determine what will be the most useful to stock up on.

21 comments:

  1. Remember that at this point in the series, there was no 'Fighting Fantasy formula', so experiments like this are so very cool to see.
    Steve Jackson's willingness to experiment was one of his strengths. It didn't always work - see Starship Traveller - but the FF range definitely benefited from his repeatedly pushing the envelope.

    I don't even bother trying to solve his riddle
    There's not enough data provided to solve it. And whichever door you choose, you encounter his 'hilarious prank' the first time.

    I didn't use one levitation spell.
    You could have if you'd fallen into that pit.

    My theory is that it's a rather crude intruder trap - IIRC, if you fall in and don't have the right spells to get out again, after a while the inhabitants of the courtyard empty a cauldron of boiling oil over you. Presumably Dire's minions have all been warned about the pit, so they conclude that anyone who falls into it isn't supposed to be there.

    This'll be the next book covered on my blog, too. But repeated play has burned the correct routes through the first dozen or so FF books into my neural pathways, so I'll be able to avoid some of the problems you encountered.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's been about 2 decades since I played this one, so even if I did once remember it all, it's long been pushed out of my brain by useless bits of internet trivia and secondary school french lesson. Ou est le chat, and all that. One thing I do remember is that when I did get to the end, I needed a levitation spell in order to win. So I think I over-stocked on them, just in case.
      I actually really like how magic is used in this book. Although that 'your spell does not work' moment still irks me.

      Delete
    2. that 'your spell does not work' moment still irks me.
      I can see a kind of logic to that one, though the book could certainly have explained it better. Presumably the shield is designed to protect you from incoming attacks (or tomatoes), but there needs to be a gap between you and the thing you want the shield to protect you from, so the shield can fit into it and block the threat. The man is already biting you, so there's no room for the shield to get between your arm and his teeth.

      Delete
    3. I think it's perfectly fine and realistic when spells fail. Even those with experience 9which we are not) occassionally cast spells that go awary. Spells can miss or be utterly inappropriate for the moment. It's life, like when a sword swipe misses. It happens. Above all, spells vary in strength and effect depending on what they're facing. Many beings are quite resistant to ceratin spells and I love how the sweet Garky is utterly able to see off 2 spells used to almost take the pee out of him. Always loved him, and I hate having to kill him, but he's got something I need to take. Feel even worse than about the Bonekeeper in FF26, though I'll NEVER EVER strike down those goblinoid children at P64. Anyone who does that deserves the worst kind of death Dire can think up. The para where it says the huddle together in fright as you approach them make me physically ill and want to kill someone myself. Of course it'll nevr happen, but my eyes did travel up or down to it once while going there by mistake when I wanted another number at another place.

      I don't get the point of that rubbish cover with the Slipper/cum Critter with red eyes. Comedic, stupid, very child's book and nothing to do with ANYTHING in the book. Now the Sidhe (wind female) she's IN the book and the new cover which gives us a rela Hydra instead of a silly overgrown snake from an old Nintendo Mario game which the original drawing in the book looks like.

      A decent amount of trees will prove this book well able to complete. Unlike his stupid 'Creature Of Havoc'-a pretentious half-fromed novel masquerading as a bad uncompleteable gamebook. It should have been thrown out at the palnning stages-best thing about it is the drawings, aside from the front cover. Marr looks the naffest sort of Goblin. Dire is way better. He's charisma and presence to spare-unlike Zagor and Marr together!

      Delete
  2. Nice playthrough and nicely written! I have to ask, though: where did you get that picture of the pile of corpses and who is the person standing atop them?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That was 'borrowed' from Quest for Glory 2 :)

      Delete
  3. I like Citadel's atmosphere but not its design. I think its problem in my eyes is that it's out to get you. Very few solutions to the situations make any sense, or they rely on things you couldn't possibly have known.

    The book is actively trolling the reader, and the only way to succeed is to play it over and over until you know the right solutions off by heart. Not to mention it strays towards 'one true path' territory. Good luck passing the Ganjees if you haven't visited exactly the right room. A room I've never found, I might add.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Every single time I've attempted this I've fallen to the Ganjees. That magical jar of Ointment has always eluded me. Actually, I tell a lie, I did find it once, only to die shortly after acquiring it. Still, Citadel is one of the more entertaining FF books in my eyes.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Yes, while the atmosphere of the book is great, and the nostalgia factor is huge, and there is much appeal in me for being allowed to play a spellcasting adventurer, Citadel of Chaos is simply not a well designed game book at all.

    Furthermore the IOS version has some bugs, and when I emailed the publisher earlier this year and told them about one of the bugs, they never replied to me. So get the paper version.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The paper version's the only one for me, I have nothing I could run an IOS version with. But yeah, it has some MASSIVE design flaws.

      Delete
    2. Curious to know what bugs, cause I only ran into one.

      Delete
  6. As a pre-teen entering the citadel at night was a creepy thing. I loved this story because compared to TWoFTM it was less mechanical, and even humorous at times (think the butler).

    The climb up the tower was like climbing Everest. The higher you got, the harder it was.

    Balthus Dire's wife gets my vote as the hottest babe in Allansia.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Super easy book in the series this one is. Finished it on my second attempt. Did great until I died due to me not knowing the final door's combination, which forced me to start from scratch, I missed one single room to tell me. But overall, id read this book first if I was new to Fighting Fantasy, really easy, short book, and loved it!

    ReplyDelete
  8. I think that this book and Scorpion Swamp are the only ones you could realistically finish if you rolled the minimum stats at the start, and for that alone it should be celebrated. Some may call that "one true path" disease, but to me it means that it's actually fair on the player.

    Dire's odd household also has a twisted sense of logic, too, doesn't it? It's a weird place, for a wierd man, but not a random string of connected rooms a la Warlock, in which card players hang out in a labyrinth down the corridor from a raging minotaur.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes I find his fortress a way better place then inside Firetop Mountain and a far better book. For the most part the pictures are better than the first, and there are really interesting encounters. The Leprechaun is funny and maddening, but you got to learn how to handle him. There's nothing wrong with "one true path". On the contrary, once you get it, it totally sets you up for the month completing it. It's a clever thing how it is-Balthus hotman is hard to reach and his protectors (Miks, Hydra, Ganjees) are tough, but many of these don't have to be fought, they can be bargained with or retreat from you once you know how (it's either guess work or fact finding on a good search)> It doesn't matter how, but the methods are there, and like life, it SHOULDbe like that. No one can and should know everything. Otherwise why would he go to all the trouble of padding out his pad with dangerous beasts and beings if we knew how to defeat them on meeting them.

      I don't think this book is random at all, but constrcuted artfully, as is the even harder but even more satisfying 'House Of Hell'. The one true way through 'Citadel' is genius-it took me a long time to relaise that everything from the spells I was using to the encounters I was either avoiding or meeting was wrong for ages. But once I got the taste for the book, I kept on, fidning out new things each time, losing my way a bit and then nailing it. And finding him was brill and then facing him. There's an ingenious battle as soon as you enter his chamber where you both throw spells at each other-but you can only advance if you pick the right spell to combat each one of his. Sort of Merlin vs. Madam Mim only you're facing a beefy hottie with the sorcerous skills of a top wizard in the body of a tasty Mexican-looking go-go boy. With brains too.

      Shawn I can't agree, bud. There's way hotter babes all over the place than her-she's all right but come on. I'd have her husband over her-and did.

      Delete
  9. You certainly can finish the book with the worst possible character, but you HAVE to take a specific list of spells. You must take One Stamina spell, One luck spell, one shielding spell, two weakness spells and one levitation spell and for the eighth you have a choice - if you want to get captured in the library and so extend the journey a bit, then take an illusion spell. If you just want to leave the library and go to the banquet hall then take either an extra stamina spell or extra luck spell instead.

    Even if by some horrible streak of rolling you rolled six ones in calculating your character's stats, you could still complete the mission fairly easily. I sppose there are a lot of avoidance options and there are not many traps which drain stamina. The spells help you avoid damage and bypass combats.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oops, add one ESP spell to that list.

      Delete
    2. You NEED to get captured in the Library. Otherwise you won't have all the stuff you need (Ornate Hairbrush, Jar of Ointment, Silver Mirror etc.) before you meet the Balthy! Justin is lucky the book let him fight the Stone Golem. That's Jackson's one main mistake. He remembers about the Gargoyle being impervious to a blade (which you don't even have to meet, and can escape from anyway) but the Stone Golem you do have to meet you can fight with a sword! What? He made from a soft pretend-look stone is he? That's pathetic so no one shoudl fight him with a sword-it's a Stoen Golem!

      You do have to think carefully about your spell choice and the route you take even through the courtyard. It's uncanny the way we almost always pick the wrong one from the word go! Anonymous is wrong-'Forest Of Doom' is super easy, and that's the one do-able with low stats. There's no way this can be done on two goes-I don't believe that at all. This book has too canny and clever a correct route.

      It's also the first book where characters jump out of the page. The Wind Woman/Sylph being, campfire three, the lovely Gark, Ghost Woman, sweet little Goblin-children in their bedroom-wish they were my adopted threesome, funny Leprechaun (WAY sweeter than the pathetic Gnome in 'Forest Of Doom' and the other Leppies in 'Deathtrap' and 'Armies Of Death'-even the bleeding Pixies in FF28. And that's how woodland beings treat Wood Elves-of all creatures! What?!

      Tell you what, stuff Mrs Dire, not bad but hardly Jella 9FF26) and Elindora (FF43) nor the fake sleeping beauty in 'Vault Of The Vampire' or the Siren in 'Trial Of Champs'. Hell I'd marry the Gark over her if I didn't take Dire. At least with Garky he's got a far nicer personality. I love the way if you tell him-a big non-human humanoid that could snap a human in half that you're a guest, he aplogises to you for being asleep! Bless. A piddling interloper like me, but maybe he's glad of the distraction. And ouch-a gaint cleaver-axe thing as a pillow! I also love the way several spells you use against him have the adverse affect on you. I've always like Garks out of all the many haumanoids best, and always felt they should be like larger Goblins and Neutral and quite happy to leave people alone and can interact with them fine.It sometimes bores me the way every non-human hasd to be on the hostile front, not least cos humans aren't perfect AND it's usually a human being causing all the trouble and whom you have to kill, and who likely treats all the beings under their sway with contempt anyway!

      Delete
    3. You NEED to get captured in the Library. Otherwise you won't have all the stuff you need (Ornate Hairbrush, Jar of Ointment, Silver Mirror etc.) before you meet the Balthy! Justin is lucky the book let him fight the Stone Golem. That's Jackson's one main mistake. He remembers about the Gargoyle being impervious to a blade (which you don't even have to meet, and can escape from anyway) but the Stone Golem you do have to meet you can fight with a sword! What? He made from a soft pretend-look stone is he? That's pathetic so no one shoudl fight him with a sword-it's a Stoen Golem!

      You do have to think carefully about your spell choice and the route you take even through the courtyard. It's uncanny the way we almost always pick the wrong one from the word go! Anonymous is wrong-'Forest Of Doom' is super easy, and that's the one do-able with low stats. There's no way this can be done on two goes-I don't believe that at all. This book has too canny and clever a correct route.

      It's also the first book where characters jump out of the page. The Wind Woman/Sylph being, campfire three, the lovely Gark, Ghost Woman, sweet little Goblin-children in their bedroom-wish they were my adopted threesome, funny Leprechaun (WAY sweeter than the pathetic Gnome in 'Forest Of Doom' and the other Leppies in 'Deathtrap' and 'Armies Of Death'-even the bleeding Pixies in FF28. And that's how woodland beings treat Wood Elves-of all creatures! What?!

      Tell you what, stuff Mrs Dire, not bad but hardly Jella 9FF26) and Elindora (FF43) nor the fake sleeping beauty in 'Vault Of The Vampire' or the Siren in 'Trial Of Champs'. Hell I'd marry the Gark over her if I didn't take Dire. At least with Garky he's got a far nicer personality. I love the way if you tell him-a big non-human humanoid that could snap a human in half that you're a guest, he aplogises to you for being asleep! Bless. A piddling interloper like me, but maybe he's glad of the distraction. And ouch-a gaint cleaver-axe thing as a pillow! I also love the way several spells you use against him have the adverse affect on you. I've always like Garks out of all the many haumanoids best, and always felt they should be like larger Goblins and Neutral and quite happy to leave people alone and can interact with them fine.It sometimes bores me the way every non-human hasd to be on the hostile front, not least cos humans aren't perfect AND it's usually a human being causing all the trouble and whom you have to kill, and who likely treats all the beings under their sway with contempt anyway!

      Delete
  10. No you don't ;-). The path through CoC is a remarkably quick one, if you know what to do. Get in the courtyard, hit the fireplace, kill the dwarf, orc and gobboes, loot them, get in the tower, Go to the Gark's room, weakness him, take the hairbrush, library, code number, hall, and up. Give the hairbrush to Mrs Dire in exchange for the fleece. Give the Ganjees the ointment from the fireplace crew. Use the fleece on the hydra, then when you fight Dire make for the curtains at the earliest opportunity. Job's a good'un.

    ReplyDelete
  11. the citadel of chaos solution:

    it contains 59 references, requires 5 spells (weakness x2, shielding x1, e.s.p. x1 and levitation x1) and you sword fight 4 creatures (dwarf, goblin, orc and a gark)

    1
    261
    81
    251
    321
    339
    134 - password
    60
    213 - dwarf, goblin, orc
    235 - key, ointment, potion of magik
    245
    161
    106
    218
    118
    273
    371
    177
    5
    40
    243
    352
    11
    152 - weakness spell, gark
    180 - hairbrush
    99
    38
    132
    238 - magical lock
    18 - information
    31
    169
    197
    363
    228
    296
    292 - lady lucretia
    42
    91 - golden fleece
    140
    25
    206
    182 - ganjees
    322
    291
    328 - hydra
    226
    37
    229
    217
    293 - shielding spell
    374 - balthus dire
    158 - weakness spell
    77
    187 - e.s.p. spell
    279 - levitation spell
    78
    124
    400

    great game book. one of my favourites and the very first one I read as a kid! the illustration of balthus dire on reference 374 is my favourite!

    ReplyDelete